Frequency-Specific Biomarkers in Neurodegenerative Disorders: Implications of Alpha and Beta Oscillations in Motor Behaviour

Abstract

Despite advancement in neuroimaging, the link between motor and cognitive processes, and the role of oscillations in motor behaviour remain unclear. Current research in neurodegenerative disorders (e.g., Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease) indicates that changes in oscillatory brain rhythms (OBRs) observed from electroencephalographic (EEG) studies could be utilized to quantify and understand the neural network changes in the presence of pathology. Research suggests, that rhythmicity is a common feature amongst biological entities, and cyclic fluctuations in neurological systems in response to incoming stimuli from the environment, grant a great degree of flexibility to such systems in order to interact with their surroundings at an optimal level. This reciprocity between exogenous stimuli and endogenous mechanisms in the brain creates a two-way pathway that awards a bi-directional relationship between the environment, and the brain. Here, in this mini review we explore the role of OBRs, and review the current literature supporting the putative role of frequency-specific OBRs as potential biomarkers in neurodegenerative disorders, mainly Parkinson’s disease (PD), which in turn, may allow clinicians to identify effective therapies based on these biomarkers, expanding the armamentarium for delaying the rate of disease progression and symptom management.

Frequency-Specific-Biomarkers-in-Neurodegenerative-Disorders_Remy_Cohan

Remy Cohan

Rémy Cohan

Neuroscience Reviews & Perspectives; with the main focus on neural oscillations and central rhythm generators.

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